Is Frigidity a Mental or a Physical Thing?

If you’re an internet person, you must have come across, at least once, over one of those erectile dysfunction commercials, promising an erect penis for days. That’s because there are men out here who suffer from erectile dysfunction. Surprising or not, there is actually a woman’s equivalent for that, and it’s called frigidity.

What Is Frigidity, Anyway?

Oh, the answer to this one is more complex than you think. At the base of a woman’s sexual dysfunction lies an entire array of emotional, psychological, physical, relationship, and lifestyle factors. The very basic definition of frigidity is a woman’s lack of response to sexual stimulus. But there’s so much more here to talk about.

What Causes It?

It’s better if we just divide the causes of frigidity into two main categories, although these categories can easily have three or more subcategories. But let’s take it one step at a time.

There are women who experience sexual dysfunction generated by physical causes. This can be anything from a disease such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, or even bladder problems. Not only are you not in the mood when you’re sick, but there’s actually medication that decreases your libido (like, antihistamins or antidepressants, for example).

Under this very same category fall women who have hormonal problems. We all know that the main hormone responsible with our reproductive system is estrogen. When its levels are low, you have less sexual appetite.

Women who are closer to menopause experience lower levels of estrogen, which impacts their sex life in a number of ways: vaginas become dryer, they have a harder time getting aroused, and their tissues change up to a point where it’s harder to orgasm because the pelvic region isn’t as sensitive as it used to be.

And if that wasn’t enough, there’s always the emotional/psychological factor to consider. This part is the most complex one of all, because we all know that women need a certain sense of security to really feel pleasure on a sexual level.

If you ever felt depressed, anxious, stressed, nervous, or darn-right sad, then you probably know what it feels like to have the mental state required to enjoy the sex act. Believe it or not, it also happens in men. There are psychological factors that can influence a man’s desire to have sex, so we’re not really all that different.

Relationship problems can also lead to frigidity, especially when you and your partner are going through a rough time. There are also women who experience frigidity out of fear of getting pregnant.

Can It Be Reversed?

With very few exceptions, getting to the root of frigidity also makes it reversible. When you’re at menopause, it’s only natural for the body to change, and you won’t experience the same sex drive as you did before. But for every other case, there’s most likely a solution.

If your frigidity is caused by a medical problem, doctors can suggest a variety of solutions, such as estrogen therapy. For emotional and psychological problems, you might need to change your lifestyle habits, seek therapy (either alone or together with your partner), and do whatever it takes to eliminate the mental barrier that’s standing right between you and your future orgasms.

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