Sex for women can be an incredibly intimate, pleasurable experience. There are times, though, that sex is painful and invasive. It makes sense to some degree because you’re being penetrated. If your body isn’t prepared for sex, it could end up being some level of uncomfortable to a higher level of excruciating pain.

Pain during sex isn’t the way it should be, but there are so many reasons you may be experiencing pain during intercourse. Let’s look at some of the causes, and how you can make it feel so much better.

Revving Up

If your partner isn’t taking time for foreplay, you’re both missing out – and it could be the reason you’re in pain during sex. It can take a while for a woman’s body to warm up and prepare for sex. Have your partner focus on light touches, oral sex, kissing, and whatever it is that blows your skirt up to prep for penetration.

Lubing Up

Sometimes our bodies just don’t want to cooperate. You’re raring to go, but your vagina is just like, “Nope.” Try a little lube to keep things comfortable. There’s nothing wrong with you, and nothing wrong with your partner.

Slowing Down

This is somewhat related to foreplay, but it’s also a sign to you and him to just take it easy at first. Slowly sliding down onto his member is not only sexy, it prepares your vagina for sex. It’s like dipping your toe in the pool and wading into the water, rather than jumping in – to a shockingly cold pool. Go deeper once you’re used to it.

A Tight Fit

We’re all different shapes and sizes, and that goes for our vaginas, too. Some women are ridiculously tight, and when paired with a man of considerable girth, sex is likely to be a bit challenging. The solution is to go very slowly, and make sure you’re properly turned on. You can prep by using a finger or two, and then move on to intercourse.

An Infection

If things are itchy, burning, or there are some weird smells coming from your panties, you might have an infection. It could be something as simple as a yeast infection, but you need to take care of it to prevent spreading infection to your partner and to make sex feel good again. Be sure to check with your doc for a proper diagnosis.

Menopause

When menopause sets in, your body goes through changes – just as it did when you went through puberty. And it isn’t just vaginal dryness. There’s also some vaginal thinning happening. Go slowly, use lube, and see your doctor for other solutions.

Endometriosis

This is a serious one because endometriosis causes your body to essentially grow the uterine lining (what your body expels during a period) on other parts inside you, like your ovaries. It can be incredibly painful, and you may need surgery. See a doctor if you notice extra painful periods, painful sex, and excessive bleeding.

Bottom line is, sex should not be painful, and if it is, look for the reasons why. If you can course correct with lube or sufficient foreplay, then hooray! Otherwise, see your gynecologist for the answer.

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